Des Plaines History Center
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Book Discussion Group

Pick up a copy today! It's available at the Readers Service desk (third floor) at the Des Plaines Public Library.

After a long cold winter, why not pick up a copy of Sin in the Second City and warm up? The History Center’s choice of Sin in the Second City brings the book group back to Chicago with this sharp and popular history of morality, sexuality, and prostitution. Author Karen Abbott focuses on the Everleigh Club, a brothel on Dearborn Street.      Her success may stem from the general public’s fascination with the seedy stories of history, and why not? Abbott’s scope, though, includes an analysis of morality relative to time, gender, class, and locale. These elements make it much more than an exhibition of a sultry past. It is also a thoughtful consideration of the oldest profession in the context of twentieth century Chicago. The book will be discussed Wednesday, May 21, from 6-7 p.m. at the History Center. And just so you know . . . Our book and Coffee Talk for July is Joe Kozenczak’s The Chicago Killer about the John Wayne Gacy investigation. I had to set the book aside a couple times because Gacy’s atrocity upset me. I chose this book because of the local connection and the fact that we could couple the book and Coffee Talk again. It is important to recognize and utilize firsthand information in doing history. Kozenczak was a valuable member of Des Plaines law enforcement for many years, and we are fortunate to be able to draw from his memories. —Philip Mohr

After a long cold winter, why not pick up a copy of Sin in the Second City and warm up?
The History Center’s choice of Sin in the Second City brings the book group back to Chicago with this sharp and popular history of morality, sexuality, and prostitution. Author Karen Abbott focuses on the Everleigh Club, a brothel on Dearborn Street.
     Her success may stem from the general public’s fascination with the seedy stories of history, and why not? Abbott’s scope, though, includes an analysis of morality relative to time, gender, class, and locale. These elements make it much more than an exhibition of a sultry past. It is also a thoughtful consideration of the oldest profession in the context of twentieth century Chicago. The book will be discussed Wednesday, May 21, from 6-7 p.m. at the History Center.


And just so you know . . .
Our book and Coffee Talk for July is Joe Kozenczak’s The Chicago Killer about the John Wayne Gacy investigation. I had to set the book aside a couple times because Gacy’s atrocity upset me. I chose this book because of the local connection and the fact that we could couple the book and Coffee Talk again. It is important to recognize and utilize firsthand information in doing history. Kozenczak was a valuable member of Des Plaines law enforcement for many years, and we are fortunate to be able to draw from his memories.
—Philip Mohr